Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs

Image credit: Sara Kate Gillingham

Image credit: Sara Kate Gillingham

This Easter try Dying your Eggs with Ingredients from your Kitchen to make Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs.

First hard boil your eggs and then choose from a variety of the recipes below to create a rainbow of colors.

What you’ll need

  • Alum (found in the spice aisle)
  • Baking Powder
  • Distilled White Vinegar
  • Yellow Onion
  • Red Onion
  • Grape Juice
  • Cranberry Juice
  • Beets

Rubber Bands (to create stripes on your eggs)

Allow to sit in dyes 8-24 hours in refrigerator

  • Orange

In a small sauce pan, simmer 1 1/4 cups water with the outer skins from 1 yellow onion for 30 minutes, covered. Remove skins and stir in 1/8 tsp alum until dissolved. Allow to cool.

  • Deep Purple

In a small sauce pan, simmer 1 1/4 cups water with the outer skins from 1 red onion for 30 minutes, covered. Remove skins and stir in 1/8 tsp alum until dissolved. Allow to cool.

  • Purple Blue

Stir 1/4 tsp. baking powder into 1 cup room-temperature grape juice.

  • Light Purple 

Stir 1/4 tsp. baking powder into 1 cup room-temperate 100% cranberry juice. 

  • Yellow

Dissolve 1 tbsp. turmeric in 1 cup boiling water. Stir in 1/4 tsp. baking powder. Allow to cool.

  • Maroon

In a small pan, simmer 1 cup shredded or chopped raw red beet in 1 1/4 cups water for 30 minutes, covered. Strain out beet and stir in 1 tsp. distilled white vinegar.

  • Blue-Green

Steep 2 blueberry or raspberry tea bags in 1 cup of boiling water for 3 minutes; remove and stir in 1/8 tsp alum.

Here’s Why We Love Eggs

Eggs are a perfect source of protein, providing all 20 amino acids, the building blocks for muscle, tissues, and cells.

They are relatively low in calories (~70 calories per egg), and they provide Vitamin D, B Vitamins, and minerals for brain and eye health.

They are also high in cholesterol and high cholesterol diets are still linked to heart disease. However, if you’re watching your cholesterol intake, there are other foods to cut back on in your diet. It’s reported that Americans get most their cholesterol from beef (burgers) and cheese, which are also high in saturated fat and trans fats.

Choosing the Right Egg

Choosing your eggs will depend on personal preference, budget, and your opinion on animal rights. Typically chickens are caged in small quarters with little if any access to the outdoors. If you value a chicken’s quality of life, you may be inclined to purchased chickens from farms that allow their chickens to roam freely. Here’s what you should know about popular terms printed on eggs.

Farm-Fresh Marketing term and has no official meaning
All Natural Marketing term and has no official meaning
Cage-Free Indicates the chickens have been allowed to walk freely
in a barn or chicken coop
Free-range Indicates the chickens can walk freely indoor and outdoors
Pasture raised Indicates the chickens are primarily outside year round
and brought in at night for protection
“Certified Humane” Stamp approved that the claim is accurate
“Animal Welfare Approve” Stamp approved that the claim is accurate

Recipes: Sunset Magazine

Image credit: Sara Kate Gillingham

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